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Knowing how to replace a broken garage door spring now could save money down the road when entire doorways give out, or tracks become unstable.

Torsion springs tend to last pretty long, although weather and consistent usage will wear them down.

Let’s look at correct garage door spring replacement:

Gather Tools

Every garage door spring fix needs proper tools. Today, we’ll need:

  • ½” thick Winding bars (18” long are standard)
  • Tape measure
  • Gloves (suggested)
  • New garage door spring
  • WD-40

Once you’ve gathered all the tools, make sure to move vehicles out of the way along with anything which could impede progress. Expect this project to last for around 90 minutes.

Garage Door

Garage Door Spring Replacement: Safety First!

Garage door springs are somewhat heavy and hold tons of weight, meaning improper removal could cause them to kickback on you.

It’s important (if possible to have help) and remove springs from the inside while the garage is down, which means there’s no pressure on the door.

Not sure you’ll understand how to replace a broken garage door spring? Stop here and phone a professional who can do this safely.

Measure Old & New Springs

Once you’ve rounded up tools and have someone helping you, you’ll need to measure old and new springs to assure proper sizes were purchased.

Aftermarket OEM parts can sometimes fluctuate in size; putting the wrong size springs into your garage door will undoubtedly affect performance, if they work at all.

To determine which springs go where, lay one spring on the left side of your garage door (facing out). Where the wire ends will point to the direction to put that spring (i.e. ends up top, points right).

Unwind Old Springs

Standing level on your ladder, insert your winding bar into a hole into the winding cone, all the way in so it’s snug. After you’ve pulled down enough to release tension, you’ll insert a second bar into the next hole. Repeat these steps until the torsion springs are both off.

Loosen Torsion Hardware

Securing the center are two torsion cones which help hold springs to bracket. You’ll need to loosen two bolts to remove this hardware, then slide the springs out toward cable drum.

You’ll need to repeat this for the other side, loosening both screws after sliding them outward. Once loose, you’ll remove the cable and examine the shaft for corrosion.

Replace Springs

Once you’ve inspected pulley, cable and shaft, it’s time to replace your springs. Essentially, you’ll perform these steps in reverse, with a few changes.

You’ll slide your drum away from bearing plate, file shaft if needed and lubricate with WD-40. Then you’ll remove the old spring, inspect, then place new spring where the old spring was.

Lubricate if needed, making sure you’re not overtightening bolts or putting more tension on springs than necessary.

Reinstall Torsion Hardware

Much like when you loosened the hardware, you’ll need to re-secure the torsion cones and cable drum to center bracket after your springs are secured. It’s sometimes easier to finger tighten the bolts before securing them.

Inspect the cones, brackets and shaft to ensure everything is properly secured and not corroded before proceeding. This phase is vital in understanding how to replace a broken garage door spring correctly.

Wind New Springs

It’s time to tighten new springs! Mark your shaft slightly beyond the cone to help determine if you have new springs on the correct sides. Then you’ll insert your winding bar into the first hole, raise, insert bar into next hole, and continue clockwise until you’ve completely secured the springs.

You’ll know if springs have been transposed because you’ll end up loosening the springs when you try and tighten them. Simply switch them out and continue working.

Check Garage Door and Reconnect Door Opener

Once your assembly is completed, make sure your door operates properly without noises, creaks, and examine your pulley and torsion springs as they go up and down.

Learning how to replace a broken garage door spring could save time, money and even help pass the time on Saturdays.

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